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The Signal kept Zimbabwe Busy

The Signal kept Zimbabwe Busy

I hope ZimDancehall artists picked a number of lessons from Busy Signal on the night of 25 October 2015. The event was a success. Watch the following clips and read the story

 
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Posted by on October 26, 2015 in Updates

 

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Don’t let obstacles stop your life journey-Bugle

Don’t let obstacles stop your life journey-Bugle

Life is always full of obstacles. There are always people ready to pull you down (The pull you down syndrome). Well from the teachings I got from Bugle’s song, ‘Journey‘, one should not let the obstacles stop your life journey. The devil always celebrate when you give up on your aspirations.

Like what Bugle says, life is not an easy road, but you cant make obstacles stop you. Be strong and hold on to your faith. Everyone is destined for greatness but some decide to quit after one or two obstacle disrupt their progress. Keep your head up high, swallow your pride and decide never to fail.Even if it means riding a bicycle and deliver mails like a post man, just go for it.Praise God that you found a job and you wont rob and go to jail. Righteousness have to prevail. Watch the video below and read the lyrics to the song Journey and get a lesson too. 

[Intro:]

Life you know
Is not easy road
But you cyaan mek obstacles stop you
Daseeeca

[Chorus:]
Some people stop by obstacles my journeys continue
Di devil is always gonna be around hauntin you Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 12, 2015 in Advocacy

 

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How was it named Dancehall music?

How was it named Dancehall music?

Many fans of what is today known as Dancehall reggae have no idea of its background/history. when the music started, it was the first in Jamaica to be computer aided in its production. as a result it was named ‘Digital reggae’. I remember in the early 90s we used to call it ‘Ma Diggie’. It so happened that it was not the only music produced using computer based software. Any other music could be produced this way and therefore the name was found not proper.

That is the time when it was named ‘Dancehall’. But where did the name come from? As written in The Story of Reggae, the name itself came up because most of the early tracks of Dancehall were deemed not suitable for radio airplay but were best for the dance hall.

Anyone who has followed it from the early days would agree with me that the vintage names that we can remember include the likes of Yellowman. Of cause a lot of today’s youths might not even know his single track. Yellowman was widely known as King Yellowman. He was popular in Jamaica in the 1980s, coming to prominence with a series of singles that established his reputation. Researching about his carrear, i found out that he released his first album1982 entitled Mister Yellowman. This was followed by Zunggu zunggu zunggu zeng in 1983. He is one of the artists who had sexually explicit lyrics that could not be played on radio hence fit for the Dancehall.

In brief, that is how the name Dancehall came about.

 
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Posted by on March 11, 2015 in History

 

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Lucky Dube deserve some respect

Lucky Dube deserve some respect

I haven’t seen it written or published anywhere but I’m sure Lucky Dube is the best reggae artist to ever come from the African soil. That one should be a fact, isn’t it?

As I was listening to some of the tracks from his album ‘Respect’, I got the inspiration to think deeper about the late reggae ambassador’s music. Truly speaking, the man contributed a lot to towards reggae and to the society in general. Lucky Dube never had time to sing ‘nonsense’ in his music. His music was full of hope, encouragement, love, unity and inspiration.

He was a rebel with a genuine cause and his music worked as a tool in mobilising people to resist Apartheid and all sorts of oppression in South Africa. His music made him become recognised as an African not necessarily as a South African. In my own opinion, his music was more powerful than coercion.

He sang universal music targeting people of all age groups from the young ones to the elderly. If an artist manages to cut across all age groups, I personally call that person a genius. Just like Bob Marley, his music was listened to by people of all races.

Just like the wailers, I think Lucky Dube contributed a notable stake in the emancipation of ‘black’ people and liberation of reggae music as a genre. His music was (and is still) against oppression, slavery, capitalism, and all sorts of societal inequalities. This is just his short summery and I’m sure everyone would agree with me that Lucky Dube is a hero.

 
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Posted by on March 10, 2015 in Analysis

 

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Culture: The International Herb

Culture: The International Herb

If ever one is going to talk about reggae and fails to mention the group ‘Culture’, I’m sure roots reggae followers would stone him. This is because Culture is on group that managed to spread reggae to many parts of the world.

Their album ‘International herb’ to me is one of their best pieces of art. I can play it over and over again but never get tired of it. Their music is so durable and is still sound fresh even after so many years of release. Definately it can not be compared to the ‘buble gum’ tipe of music that a lot of musicians are producing these days. I mean that music that you can not play five times before throwing it in the rubbish bin.

If all reggae artists could follow the trend set by the likes of Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Gregory Isacs and other musicians in that category I think our music would go back to originality.

 
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Posted by on March 9, 2015 in Analysis

 

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Red Rat was right

Red Rat was right

When Red Rat did a song on anti bleaching some 5 years ago, a lot of people took him as insane. I think what he was just trying to highlight is that a lot of people are adopting this self denial behavior. Surprisingly, musicians who are supposed to be positive models in society are becoming the bleaching advocates.

Artists from the ‘Gazza’ side of dancehall are in the forefront of promoting this skin bleaching thing. First, it was Vybz Kartel who completely changed his complexion from dark brow to an almost white skin color. My question is, ‘What values was he trying to promote?’.

Red Rat is one of his songs said skin bleaching is a sign of black people trying to look like white people. A sign that they are not proud of their African skin. In emphasising this, Red Rat actually said ‘Bleach out face, dem looking like dead people…face red like the devil, dem looking so evil.

Those dancehall artists in that skin lightening ‘syndrome’ are tarnishing Reggae image. Listen to the track below

 
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Posted by on March 7, 2015 in Advocacy

 

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The truth about I-Octane and Vanessa Bling

The truth about I-Octane and Vanessa Bling

When I-Octane and Vanessa Bling‘s picture caused a lot of controversy on the social networks I could not believe what people were saying. As a result, I had to research more on the issue. People were saying I-Octane is dating the Gaza empress but I could not buy that. After reading through a lot of articles, I finally came to the main issue behind that picture.

This picture was taken as a publicity and promotional image for their collaboration song titled ‘Cya Do It’. This song is likely to make history if people really give it time. It appears on the How it feel Riddim which is already on almost everyone’s mobile music player. Check them out in the video below.People always have something to say isn’t it?

 
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Posted by on March 5, 2015 in News

 

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