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The Signal kept Zimbabwe Busy

The Signal kept Zimbabwe Busy

I hope ZimDancehall artists picked a number of lessons from Busy Signal on the night of 25 October 2015. The event was a success. Watch the following clips and read the story

 
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Posted by on October 26, 2015 in Updates

 

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Don’t let obstacles stop your life journey-Bugle

Don’t let obstacles stop your life journey-Bugle

Life is always full of obstacles. There are always people ready to pull you down (The pull you down syndrome). Well from the teachings I got from Bugle’s song, ‘Journey‘, one should not let the obstacles stop your life journey. The devil always celebrate when you give up on your aspirations.

Like what Bugle says, life is not an easy road, but you cant make obstacles stop you. Be strong and hold on to your faith. Everyone is destined for greatness but some decide to quit after one or two obstacle disrupt their progress. Keep your head up high, swallow your pride and decide never to fail.Even if it means riding a bicycle and deliver mails like a post man, just go for it.Praise God that you found a job and you wont rob and go to jail. Righteousness have to prevail. Watch the video below and read the lyrics to the song Journey and get a lesson too. 

[Intro:]

Life you know
Is not easy road
But you cyaan mek obstacles stop you
Daseeeca

[Chorus:]
Some people stop by obstacles my journeys continue
Di devil is always gonna be around hauntin you Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 12, 2015 in Advocacy

 

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How was it named Dancehall music?

How was it named Dancehall music?

Many fans of what is today known as Dancehall reggae have no idea of its background/history. when the music started, it was the first in Jamaica to be computer aided in its production. as a result it was named ‘Digital reggae’. I remember in the early 90s we used to call it ‘Ma Diggie’. It so happened that it was not the only music produced using computer based software. Any other music could be produced this way and therefore the name was found not proper.

That is the time when it was named ‘Dancehall’. But where did the name come from? As written in The Story of Reggae, the name itself came up because most of the early tracks of Dancehall were deemed not suitable for radio airplay but were best for the dance hall.

Anyone who has followed it from the early days would agree with me that the vintage names that we can remember include the likes of Yellowman. Of cause a lot of today’s youths might not even know his single track. Yellowman was widely known as King Yellowman. He was popular in Jamaica in the 1980s, coming to prominence with a series of singles that established his reputation. Researching about his carrear, i found out that he released his first album1982 entitled Mister Yellowman. This was followed by Zunggu zunggu zunggu zeng in 1983. He is one of the artists who had sexually explicit lyrics that could not be played on radio hence fit for the Dancehall.

In brief, that is how the name Dancehall came about.

 
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Posted by on March 11, 2015 in History

 

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Lucky Dube deserve some respect

Lucky Dube deserve some respect

I haven’t seen it written or published anywhere but I’m sure Lucky Dube is the best reggae artist to ever come from the African soil. That one should be a fact, isn’t it?

As I was listening to some of the tracks from his album ‘Respect’, I got the inspiration to think deeper about the late reggae ambassador’s music. Truly speaking, the man contributed a lot to towards reggae and to the society in general. Lucky Dube never had time to sing ‘nonsense’ in his music. His music was full of hope, encouragement, love, unity and inspiration.

He was a rebel with a genuine cause and his music worked as a tool in mobilising people to resist Apartheid and all sorts of oppression in South Africa. His music made him become recognised as an African not necessarily as a South African. In my own opinion, his music was more powerful than coercion.

He sang universal music targeting people of all age groups from the young ones to the elderly. If an artist manages to cut across all age groups, I personally call that person a genius. Just like Bob Marley, his music was listened to by people of all races.

Just like the wailers, I think Lucky Dube contributed a notable stake in the emancipation of ‘black’ people and liberation of reggae music as a genre. His music was (and is still) against oppression, slavery, capitalism, and all sorts of societal inequalities. This is just his short summery and I’m sure everyone would agree with me that Lucky Dube is a hero.

 
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Posted by on March 10, 2015 in Analysis

 

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Culture: The International Herb

Culture: The International Herb

If ever one is going to talk about reggae and fails to mention the group ‘Culture’, I’m sure roots reggae followers would stone him. This is because Culture is on group that managed to spread reggae to many parts of the world.

Their album ‘International herb’ to me is one of their best pieces of art. I can play it over and over again but never get tired of it. Their music is so durable and is still sound fresh even after so many years of release. Definately it can not be compared to the ‘buble gum’ tipe of music that a lot of musicians are producing these days. I mean that music that you can not play five times before throwing it in the rubbish bin.

If all reggae artists could follow the trend set by the likes of Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Gregory Isacs and other musicians in that category I think our music would go back to originality.

 
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Posted by on March 9, 2015 in Analysis

 

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Red Rat was right

Red Rat was right

When Red Rat did a song on anti bleaching some 5 years ago, a lot of people took him as insane. I think what he was just trying to highlight is that a lot of people are adopting this self denial behavior. Surprisingly, musicians who are supposed to be positive models in society are becoming the bleaching advocates.

Artists from the ‘Gazza’ side of dancehall are in the forefront of promoting this skin bleaching thing. First, it was Vybz Kartel who completely changed his complexion from dark brow to an almost white skin color. My question is, ‘What values was he trying to promote?’.

Red Rat is one of his songs said skin bleaching is a sign of black people trying to look like white people. A sign that they are not proud of their African skin. In emphasising this, Red Rat actually said ‘Bleach out face, dem looking like dead people…face red like the devil, dem looking so evil.

Those dancehall artists in that skin lightening ‘syndrome’ are tarnishing Reggae image. Listen to the track below

 
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Posted by on March 7, 2015 in Advocacy

 

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The truth about I-Octane and Vanessa Bling

The truth about I-Octane and Vanessa Bling

When I-Octane and Vanessa Bling‘s picture caused a lot of controversy on the social networks I could not believe what people were saying. As a result, I had to research more on the issue. People were saying I-Octane is dating the Gaza empress but I could not buy that. After reading through a lot of articles, I finally came to the main issue behind that picture.

This picture was taken as a publicity and promotional image for their collaboration song titled ‘Cya Do It’. This song is likely to make history if people really give it time. It appears on the How it feel Riddim which is already on almost everyone’s mobile music player. Check them out in the video below.People always have something to say isn’t it?

 
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Posted by on March 5, 2015 in News

 

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When Dancehall was still reggae

When I heard a colleague playing Catty Ranks and Shaka Demas’ music in his car, it really took me down the memory lane. Remembering the good old days when Dancehall was still reggae. I remember those days when we used to dance to Shabba Ranks’ Ting a ling. For real those were the days. Before the commodification of the sweet good music.

When Dancehall music started, back in the day, it was just a dance version of reggae music. The only difference was the up tempo beat and the party mood it brought in. today it is said to be a sub branch of reggae but I would like to argue that with time it is slowly divorcing from the main core.

Back in the day in the period between 1985 and 2000, the only difference between reggae and dancehall was the tempo in the beat. The theme, lyrics and ethics all went back to the basics of reggae. Those were the days before the ‘Gazzarisation’ of reggae music. Before talented youths used their talent to manipulate the sound of reggae. Those were the days before the fans started controlling the artist. I mean the days when an artist was in charge of the people, setting the pace on what they should listen to.

Such were the days when body bleaching and tattooing was taboo in the reggae community. Can someone bring back. I remember around 1992 on a Christmass party we were dancing to Ting a ling as a family and it all looked good.

Can someone tell me if it is still possible to play RDX on a family gathering? We used to watch Shaka Demas on national TV during the prime time. Can we still play Spice’s ‘So mi like it’ on national TV and feel good about it? I don’t think so. Dancehall has taken the lost ways and if it continue like that, it is going to be completely divorced from reggae

 
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Posted by on March 4, 2015 in Analysis

 

How many children did Bob Marley have?

How many children did Bob Marley have?

“Family means everything to the Marley family. It is our life, an expression of our love.” – Sister Rita Marley

When you saw the headline, ‘How many children did Bob Marley have’ what answers came to your head. I know a lot of people will only think of Ziggy Marley. Some will only add Damian Marley to the list. Some will make them three by adding Stephen Marley. A few would probably make an effort to come up with a list of 5 after scratching their heads over and over again.How many of you know about Bob Marley’s daughters? Of cause there are a lot who know the full list of Marley’s children but there are a lot who don’t know. Curiosity made me research more about The Marley Children.

Well according to Bob Marley official website, the Reggae Legend had 11 children. However, those who follow reggae would agree with me that every now and then the media tell us about one more child making them 12. Other sources add one more child and they could be more out there.

Sharon Marley

Sharon Marley

1.Sharon Marley was born on November 23, 1964, to Rita in previous relationship. Information available about her reveals that she is a singer dancer and curator. She was adopted into Bob Marley’s family when he married Rita.

Cadella Marley

Cadella Marley

2.Cedella Marley was born on August 23, 1967. She is the First daughter of Bob and Rita. Cadella is a singer, dancer , fashion designer, and actress as well as an entrepreneur. According to her Twitter profile, Cadella is the C.E.O of Tuff Gong International, and she is one of four Melody Makers, and mom of three.

3.David  Nesta “Ziggy” Marley was born on October 17, 1968, to Rita and Bob Marley.

Ziggy Marley

Ziggy Marley

He is currently one of the leading reggae musicians and leader of the band The Melody Makers. Ziggy is Bob and Rita’s oldest son. He has also acted in the movies Shark Tale (2004) Life and Debt (2001) A reggae session (1988) A child’s garden of poetry (2011) Ziggy Marley: love is my religion (2007).

Stephen Marley

Stephen Marley

4.Stephen Robert Nesta ‘Raggamuffin’ Marley was born on April 20, 1972, to Rita and Bob Marley. he is also part oft of Ziggy Marley’s band and a six-time Grammy award winner.

Robbie Marley

Robbie Marley

5.Robert “Robbie” Marley was born on May 16, 1972, to Pat Williams and Bob Marley.Robbie was born less than a month after Stephen and was Bob’s first of many children he fathered without his wife Rita.  Not much is known about his mother Pat “Lucille” Williams as Robbie was brought to live with Bob and Rita.  He is not a musician and has mostly stayed out of the spotlight as a motorcycle stunt rider.

Rohan Marley

Rohan Marley

6.Rohan Antony Marley was born on May 19, 1972, to Janet Hunt and Bob Marley. He is an entrepreneur and former American Football player

7.Karen Marley was born 1973 in England to Janet Bowen and Bob Marley. She is Bob Marley’s

Karen Marley

Karen Marley

third biological daughter. Karen however grew up in England with other Marley children.

8.Stephanie Marley was born on August 17, 1974. Not much about her has been published but yes she was acknowledged as Bob’s daughter. available information reveals that she

Stephanie Marley

Stephanie Marley

was born out of wedlock after Rita had an affair with a man named Ital. Bob adopted Stephanie and accepted her as his own and she is officially recognized as one of his children.

Jillian Marley

Jillian Marley

9.Julian Marley was born on June 4, 1975, to Lucy Pounder . Julian is a singer, songwriter, producer and self-taught musician with three albums to his credit, most recently 2009′s Grammy-nominated album Awake.

Ky-Mani Marley

Ky-Mani Marley

10.Ky-Mani Marley was born on February 26, 1976, to Anita Belnavis, a Caribbean table tennis champion.  according to Raul, Ky-Mani was initially more interested in sports than in making music, but that all changed when he discovered a knack for rapping and singing and released his debut album, Like Father Like Son, in 1996.

Damian Marley

Damian Marley

11.Damian Robert Nester “ Jr Gongn was born on July 21, 1978, to Cindy Breakspeare. he is the youngest son on the list available from the official Bob Marley website. Damian mother was 1976 Miss World and one of Bob’s most known about girlfriends.  Damian is nicknamed “Jr. Gong” after his father. and is a dancehall reggae artist and Grammy Award winner.

Makeda Marley

Makeda Marley

12. According to The Dread Library, another child Makeda Marley  was born on May 30, 1981, to Yvette Crichton, after Marley’s death. She is not listed on the official website but she is the youngest of Bob Marley’s children.

Imani Carole

Imani Carole

Other sources such as Chelsea’s Entertainment and Raul also add to the list Imani Carole born in 1963. She was actually born before Bob’s marriage to Rita. this therefore means she is the eldest of all.

So how many are they? I think they are more than that.

Information for this article mainly came from Bob Marley official Website and some came from an article by Raul. You can read more by following links available in this article.Watch this video for Marley Children’s brief bio in slide show. 

 
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Posted by on March 3, 2015 in History

 

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Pure Niceness: One of Zimbabwe’s best reggae productions

Pure Niceness: One of Zimbabwe’s best reggae productions

In as much as Zimbabwean reggae is concerned, Pure Niceness Riddim is one piece of art that we should never forget. Of all production works from Chillsport records under the engineering of Levels, this is the best touch so far. Listening to it with an accurate reggae ear, you will be not normal if you fail to rate this production as an international standard.

All artists who put their voices on this riddim knew what they were doing at that point in time. I don’t know what happens to them when they give us sub-standard tunes. If ever they were mentored to sing in the way they did, then that mentor should open a university of reggae music.

I’m not saying these artists usually don’t know what they do. I’m glad to mention that artists like Juwela, Kinnah and Ras Caleb are already international standard. I’m still yet to research on how they are failing to make it on the international map. Juwela, if you are reading this please get back to me…we need to talk. The first time I head this production was on Zimbabwe’s finest radio as they call it ZiFM Stereo. I heard the track Tokwe Mukosi from the ever rising youth Ras Caleb. I remember that moment I really felt that reggae music is back home.

Juwela:The ever rising queen of Zimbabwean Reggae

Juwela:The ever rising queen of Zimbabwean Reggae

As if that was not enough, when I managed to acquire the full compilation album, I listened to the track Stop the tears by Juwela and I was like ‘whaat?” is this the real Juwela or its someone else. Factually speaking, she killed it much better than anyone else on that compilation in as far as reggae standards are concerned. When I heard Kinna’s track, ‘Wings from Jah’, of cause I wasn’t expecting anything less than that. I had already rated him on international standards by then. Still my question is ‘How is he failing to make it across borders’- don’t worry continue reading my articles, soon I will bring an accurate answer to that. I’ve already started my research.

Nadine Brown is one artist on this riddim whom we should always remember. This is one of her best tracks; of cause she has many best tracks and this happens to be one of them. Tocky Vibes whose lyrics are usually positive; this time I could manage to listen to his tune from the spine rather than from the ear like what I do to most of his tracks. Well what I’m saying is that Tocky Vybz is a good artist but the thing is he seems to appeal to the dance and not the sub conscious. From his music, I can’t identify the reggae touch when he concentrate on the dance but when he gets back to reggae…however on this compilation I managed to associate him with reggae music. Actually I think he sounds real when he is in reggae than in the so called ZimDancehall. He is a good artist. Big up Tocky Vybz…please, can someone tell him to concentrate more on reggae than on Zimdancehall.

Anyway, my argument is that, if Levels could go back to the drawing board and structure his productions with ‘Pure Niceness’ as the yardstick, then he is good to go in as much as reggae music is concerned.Watch the video below.

 
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Posted by on March 2, 2015 in Analysis

 

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